Archives for cross country running

The Athlete Profile – Part 1

Track coaches use the disciplines of physiology and psychology to develop successful athletes.  This can be difficult in part because coaches usually work with large groups of athletes in their training group.  The application of unique training and psychological stimuli within the training group is called individualization of training.  To do this effectively is critical…

Shifting the Training Paradigm

Cross country running does not require a great deal of skill, a fact that makes physical conditioning of vital importance.  With little need to work on skill development, more and harder training is often seen as the only path to success.  Unfortunately, this path usually leads to injury, immune system problems, psychological burn-out, and a…

The Secretions of a Winner

It has been jokingly said that 83% of statistics are made up on the spot in conversation.  Coaches do this all the time, as they say such things as: “give me 110% effort today” (huh?), “slow the second lap down to 95%” (again, huh?), or the classic line; “sports is 90% psychological and 10% physical”. …

Finishing the Race

  One of the most frustrating aspects of analyzing cross country running training is the post-race reflection of an athlete’s sub par performance.  Even the really great performances have something sour that catches the coaches’ critical eye.  As in any analytical, cause-result relationship, the result is more obvious than the cause.  One of the more…

Hydration and Carbohydrate Replacement

While distance runners should be concerned about fluid replacement every day that they are in training, the summer heat puts these concerns at the top of the list.  Like so many issues in sport training there is no shortage of anecdotal information about hydration, and then there is the scientific research.  The goal is to…

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